Say no to paper surveys and yes to time and cost-savings!

The most important element of running a successful engagement survey is making sure people have the opportunity to have their say. However, when your employees don’t have email addresses this can be challenging.

Traditionally, paper surveys would be the go-to method to use for ‘offline’ employees (those without email addresses). But this can be a, timely, expensive and complicated process.

Problems with paper surveys:

  • Given to the wrong employee(s)
  • Edited by a colleague or manager
  • Damaged in transit
  • Lower response rates
  • High cost to print, post and capture responses
  • Longer time for results to be returned once the surveys are completed

What other option do you have to contact people without email addresses?

Kiosk mode enables people to take part in a survey by using their smart phone, tablet, laptop, PC or even an on-premise PC. All they need is internet access, the weblink and their unique access code. WorkBuzz provides the link and access codes to an organisation to share, so emails are completely taken out of the process!

In 2018 our average response rate for an online-only survey was 83%; 12% higher than those surveys which used paper surveys.

Wedge Group Galvanizing, the UK’s largest hot dip galvanizing organisation, is just one example of a WorkBuzz client who has made the switch from Paper to Kiosk mode. In 2018, using Kiosk Mode, Wedge achieved a 94% response rate with more than 800 individuals taking part.

Robin Fry, Director of HR at Wedge commented:

“Overall, we agreed to move to kiosk mode and eliminate hard paper copy survey for 4 main reasons.

1. We eliminated an administration task associated with the paper survey at each of our sites, when response forms had to be initially distributed, then gathered after completion, and posted. This was really beneficial as on a previous survey some forms got lost in this process.

2. We could receive the analysis of our results much faster as WorkBuzz were not reliant on the postal returns and had no data entry process to go through.

3. Costs were lower because WorkBuzz had no forms to print and distribute.

4. Employees completing the survey could be more confident of confidentiality, because the result was transmitted directly through to WorkBuzz, without any interference from site.”

How did Wedge administer Kiosk mode?

“We needed to make a computer available to our shop floor employees, who carry out manual work, and do not use computers in their normal roles. That’s why we placed the computer in a private space and allowed each employee time to complete the survey. For many of those employees, they needed to be helped to access the survey, then left in private to complete and submit them. As with paper, as a manufacturing business, we still had to allow each employee time away from their normal workplace to complete the survey.”

Questions To Help Your Team Click With Your Organisation’s Vision

Questions To Help Your Team Click With Your Organisation’s Vision

How To Share Your Organisation’s Vision With Your Team

SUMMARY:

Whatever you’re doing, it’s important to have a sense of purpose. Here’s how to help your team click.

President John F. Kennedy was paying his first visit to NASA’s headquarters. During his tour, he noticed a caretaker mopping the floor in one of the main corridors. The President stopped, shook his hand, and asked what he did at NASA. The caretaker proudly addressed the young President by saying, “Sir, I’m helping to put a man on the moon.”

This story sums up what employee engagement is all about. The caretaker understood what NASA was aspiring to achieve and why this was so important to the American people. Like everyone else involved in that project, he felt that his contribution, regardless of how large or visible, had a direct connection with the moment that Neil Armstrong took that first step on the moon.

Whether you’re a manager in NASA or any other company, your role is to help your team members see the bigger picture (your organisation’s vision), how the organisation plans to achieve this (the strategy) and how they can contribute to it.

When you’ve communicated this to your team, invite them to share their thoughts and have a discussion. The following five questions can be extremely useful in helping to frame the discussion.

  1. Is the organisation on track to realising its vision?
  2. What are they main challenges?
  3. What benefits will our customers/employees/investors see?
  4. How do our roles contribute to our vision and objectives?
  5. If we are great at what we do, what difference does this make?

These conversations don’t necessarily have definite answers – but they should encourage debate and the discussion of different perspectives.

It’s important to be transparent and open, so continue talking about the vision with your team and reinforcing the connection between the organisation’s vision, strategy and values, as well as what is happening in your day-to-day environment. A great way to do this can be by sharing:

– Progress updates

– Individual/team performance targets being met

– Awards and local recognition

 

Engagement vs Alignment

Engaged employees, who are committed to going the extra mile, will only be fully effective if their actions are aligned with your organisation’s goals and strategy.  Think about your team’s alignment and engagement by using the below model:

 

 

Ideally, every employee should be a Champion of their organisation. They should know the business strategy and exactly how they contribute to delivering results in line with the organisation’s vision. Consider your own team and where individuals would sit on this axis. Could you help them to better understand the vision?

Helping your employees connect with your organisation’s purpose and values

It’s likely that your organisation will have already communicated its vision, strategy and corporate values via your website, intranet and internal communications channels. Whatever language your organisation uses, the strategy should provide you with a clear direction of where your organisation is going and how it intends to get there, including plans to adapt, grow or change in the future. It’s up to you, however, to ensure that your team understands and connects with this vision.

5 Questions To Help Your Team Click With Your Organisation’s Vision

How To Share Your Organisation’s Vision With Your Team

President John F. Kennedy was paying his first visit to NASA’s headquarters. During his tour, he noticed a caretaker mopping the floor in one of the main corridors. The President stopped, shook his hand, and asked what he did at NASA. The caretaker proudly addressed the young President by saying, “Sir, I’m helping to put a man on the moon.”

This story sums up what employee engagement is all about. The caretaker understood what NASA was aspiring to achieve and why this was so important to the American people. Like everyone else involved in that project, he felt that his contribution, regardless of how large or visible, had a direct connection with the moment that Neil Armstrong took that first step on the moon.

Whether you’re a manager in NASA or any other company, your role is to help your team members see the bigger picture (your organisation’s vision), how the organisation plans to achieve this (the strategy) and how they can contribute to it.

When you’ve communicated this to your team, invite them to share their thoughts and have a discussion. The following five questions can be extremely useful in helping to frame the discussion.

  1. Is the organisation on track to realising its vision?
  2. What are they main challenges?
  3. What benefits will our customers/employees/investors see?
  4. How do our roles contribute to our vision and objectives?
  5. If we are great at what we do, what difference does this make?

These conversations don’t necessarily have definite answers – but they should encourage debate and the discussion of different perspectives.

It’s important to be transparent and open, so continue talking about the vision with your team and reinforcing the connection between the organisation’s vision, strategy and values, as well as what is happening in your day-to-day environment. A great way to do this can be by sharing:

– Progress updates

– Individual/team performance targets being met

– Awards and local recognition

 

Engagement vs Alignment

Engaged employees, who are committed to going the extra mile, will only be fully effective if their actions are aligned with your organisation’s goals and strategy.  Think about your team’s alignment and engagement by using the below model:

 

 

Ideally, every employee should be a Champion of their organisation. They should know the business strategy and exactly how they contribute to delivering results in line with the organisation’s vision. Consider your own team and where individuals would sit on this axis. Could you help them to better understand the vision?

Helping your employees connect with your organisation’s purpose and values

It’s likely that your organisation will have already communicated its vision, strategy and corporate values via your website, intranet and internal communications channels. Whatever language your organisation uses, the strategy should provide you with a clear direction of where your organisation is going and how it intends to get there, including plans to adapt, grow or change in the future. It’s up to you, however, to ensure that your team understands and connects with this vision.